Friday, June 12, 2009

Voting is Over - Reform is Waiting

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With a population of 70 million, Iran is not the nation it was before or during the revolution of 1979. Life under the Sha grew repressive (following an assassination attempt) and his reign was viewed as that of a puppet government, this forged the alliance which rules today's Islamic Republic of Iran. The facts driving a push for reform in today's voting are found in demographics as well as Persian history. There are similarities in the current 'reformist' movement and the upheaval of 30 yrs ago despite that fact that more than two-thirds of Iran's present population is under 30 years old.

Is history repeating itself in Iran?



Mousavi's campaign has captured the most attention and has rekindled reformist tendencies of Persian people.
"What I've seen on the streets of Tehran is visible in the rest of the country," says Mousavi.

"There's a sense of identity, and a bravery to express a desire for change. What I have done is provide a focal point for people's dissatisfaction."

Mousavi is in many ways an unlikely champion of this crowd. His history as a revolutionary led to his election as the Islamic Republic's first prime minister, and his talk of exporting the revolution to the rest of the Middle East gave no hints of any reformist leanings.

But 20 years out of the political fray, during which time he built a career as an architect and occasional painter, appears to have mellowed the ideologue in him.

"The conditions in this country have changed," he says. "The revolution has changed. There were specific conditions at the beginning of the revolution, particular motives and the motivation." It's time for Iran to understand that its place in the world is as a partner and a power, he says.
(quote and image from Al Jazeera)

As the Mantra of Hope and Change spreads in Persia the outcome of this election hangs in the balance. People across the globe watch and pray for peace and prosperity.


2 comments:

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